South Carolina Knife Laws

scSouth Carolina has one of the least restrictive weapons laws when it comes to owning and carrying knives. The laws specifically mentioning knives is practically non-existent, and difficult to find. This article shows you the law and explains what it means in plain English.

What is Legal to Own

  • It is legal to own a switchblade
  • It is legal to own a Balisong, or butterfly, knife
  • It is legal to own a Bowie knife
  • It is legal to own a dirk, dagger, or other stabbing knife
  • It is legal to own a stiletto
  • It is legal to own a disguised knife, such as in a lipstick or belt buckle

What is Illegal to Own

  • It is legal to own any type of knife in South Carolina.

Restrictions on Carry

  • It is legal to conceal carry dirk
  • It is legal to conceal carry a switchblade knife
  • It is legal to conceal carry a Balisong, or butterfly knife
  • It is legal to conceal carry a Bowie knife
  • It is legal to conceal carry a stiletto

South Carolina law explicitly excludes “dirks” and “knives” from the conceal carry statute, unless they are used with the intent to commit a crime or in the furtherance of a crime. The conceal carry statute however, does cover, “any other type of weapon, device, or object which may be used to inflict bodily injury or death”. Thus, while it may begin legal to carry a dirk or knife concealed, if the carrier were found carrying concealed under certain circumstances, it might become illegal.

What the Law States

§ 16-23-460. Carrying concealed weapons; forfeiture of weapons.

(A) A person carrying a deadly weapon usually used for the infliction of personal injury concealed about his person is guilty of a misdemeanor, must forfeit to the county, or, if convicted in a municipal court, to the municipality, the concealed weapon, and must be fined not less than two hundred dollars nor more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned not less than thirty days nor more than ninety days…..

…..(C) The provisions of this section also do not apply to rifles, shotguns, dirks, slingshots, metal knuckles, knives, or razors unless they are used with the intent to commit a crime or in furtherance of a crime.

Definition of Weapon

In 2008, the South Carolina legislature amended its definition of “weapon”, deleting “a knife with a blade over two inches long” from it. The definition now reads:

“weapon” means firearm (rifle, shotgun, pistol, or similar device that propels a projectile through the energy of an explosive), a blackjack, a metal pipe or pole, or any other type of device, or object which may be used to inflict bodily injury or death.

By deleting the phrase “knife with a blade over two inches long”, the legislature did not quite make it legal to carry a knife concealed, as the conceal carry statute specifically excludes knives as a weapon covered by it, unless the carrier uses the knife to commit a crime or in the furtherance of a crime.

Conclusion on South Carolina Knife Laws

It is legal to own or open carry any kind of knife in South Carolina. It is legal to conceal carry any type of knife, so long as you do not use the knife to commit or aid in the commission of a crime.

Sources

  • S.C. Code Ann. § 16-23-460 (2012)
  • S.C. Code Ann. § 16-23-405 (2012)
  • Frisk Chara

    Sweet! I’m gonna start carrying my bowie knife (over 12 inches long) and maybe even a katana.. Ooh, or maybe my broadsword!

  • Wyatt

    I am 14 and I have a butterfly knife is that OK in SC?

  • Buddy Gaston

    Just spoke to the Myrtle Beach PD and asked about carrying a folding knife, if there was a law that would prohibit one from carrying. The lady put me on hold to get some clarification and came back and told me as long as it’s under 3 inches you can carry one. So who is wrong here? This would not be the first time the MBPD have got it wrong. I know there are a lot of laws they have to remember and understand but…
    Any got a real answer??

  • Devin

    Would having the knife in your pocket clipped with the actual knife in the pocket be considered concealed?